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11 Theses on the Glory of the Lord’s Day - Doug Wilson


Video from Blog & Mablog


"My intention here is to set out eleven theses on why Reformed Christians should glory in the Lord’s Day, on the first day of the week, receiving it with gladness as the Christian sabbath. There is no reason for embarrassment on the question. At the same time, it should be noted that these eleven theses need to be woven together. They are not offered as stand-alone proofs. Think of these statements as eleven pieces of a puzzle. You won’t see the picture until they are placed all together. Doug Wilson's Blog & Mablog video is presented by @CanonPress.' from video introduction


Transcript

Introduction

"The Christian world is remarkably united when it comes to honoring the first day of the week as the day when the Lord is to be worshiped, but when it comes to our theology of it, we are all over the road. Our practice is largely uniform (with a handful of exceptions), but our thinking about it is varied and inconsistent. In our day, most Christians worship on the first day of the week as a matter of tradition, convenience, and inertia, and if pressed on the point by a Seventh Day Adventist, reply with a sweeping appeal to Colossians 2:16.

But the challenge is greater for those in the Reformed tradition because we observe the first day as the Christian sabbath, and that means we have to give an account for the change of day from the seventh day to the first, and to do so without seeming like we are being a bit cavalier with the words of the Ten Commandments. It does seem awkward and asymmetrical to say that the timeless moral authority of the Decalogue arises out of nine and a half of the commands. Nobody likes seeing the Ten Commandments walk with a limp.

And so my intention here is to set out eleven theses on why Reformed Christians should glory in the Lord’s Day, on the first day of the week, receiving it with gladness as the Christian sabbath. There is no reason for embarrassment on the question.

At the same time, it should be noted that these eleven thesis need to be woven together. They are not offered as stand-alone proofs. Think of these statements as eleven pieces of a puzzle. You won’t see the picture until they are placed all together.

Starting at the Shallow End

Under the direction of the apostles, it is plain that the early Christians met for worship on the first day of the week. Since the Israelites had been worshiping the Lord on the seventh day for many centuries, this change of day—made among Jewish Christians without any noticeable controversy—is really remarkable. Everyone seems to take it in stride. Nothing could have accomplished something like this without a monumental cosmological shift, understood by everyone as such, and which we will get to shortly. But let us begin with the mere fact of the shift.." from the website: dougwils.com


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