Cinema & The Arts as Sermons: The Ultimate Antidote for Cynicism: It’s a Wonderful Life


Video from Like Stories of Old


"A video essay looking at It’s a Wonderful Life and its discussion on individualism that is arguably more relevant than ever. Featured films; It’s a Wonderful Life Star Wars: A New Hope Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone Music; United States Marine Band – Auld Lang Syne Danzi: Wind Quintet Op 67 No 3 In E-Flat Major, 1 Larghetto - Allegro Moderato (played by Soni Ventorum Wind Quintet) Kevin Macleod – Angels We Have Heard Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...). Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Elgar - Ave Verum Corpus, Op. 2 Dexter Britain – Auld Lang Syne – Licensed at; https://www.musicbed.com/artists/dext..." from video introduction.


I grew up with this movie as a perennial favorite along with others The Wizard of Oz and The Ten Commandments, TV events that many people eagerly looked forward to. The culture of the time in America is captured there on celluloid. Let us not look upon it with 'nostalgia" as such but as an example to reclaim some of the character, virtues and values that are missing form our society today! - Andy


The movie in its entirety can be seen in the video below.

Video from CineCare Classics


"It's a Wonderful Life is a 1946 American Christmas family fantasy drama film produced and directed by Frank Capra, based on the short story and booklet The Greatest Gift, which Philip Van Doren Stern self-published in 1943 and is in turn loosely based on the 1843 Charles Dickens novella A Christmas Carol. The film stars James Stewart as George Bailey, a man who has given up his personal dreams, in order to help others in his community, and whose suicide attempt on Christmas Eve brings about the intervention of his guardian angel, Clarence Odbody (Henry Travers). Clarence shows George how he, George, has touched the lives of others and how different life would be for his wife Mary and his community of Bedford Falls if he had not been born. Theatrically, the film's break-even point was $6.3 million, about twice the production cost, a figure it did not come close to achieving on its initial release. Because of the film's disappointing sales, Capra was seen by some studios as having lost his ability to produce popular, financially successful films. Although It's a Wonderful Life initially received mixed reviews and was unsuccessful at the box office, it became a classic Christmas film after it was put into the public domain, which allowed it to be broadcast without licensing or royalty fees. It's a Wonderful Life is considered one of the greatest films of all time. It was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and has been recognized by the American Film Institute as one of the 100 best American films ever made. It was No. 11 on the American Film Institute's 1998 greatest movie list, No. 20 on its 2007 greatest movie list, and No. 1 on its list of the most inspirational American films of all time. Capra revealed that it was his favorite among the films he directed and that he screened it for his family every Christmas season. It was also Jimmy Stewart's favorite film. In 1990, the film was designated as "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" and added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress." from video introduction.



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