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Rachel Griffis, Julie Ooms, & Rachel Roberts - Deep Reading


The authors present reading as a remedy for three prevalent cultural vices--distraction, hostility, and consumerism--that impact the possibility of formative reading. (from the publisher)


Do you ever read deeply?

Do you make time and read a book that requires thinking beyond what you normally challenge yourself to read?

If we aspire to be lifelong learners we are always reading, pushing the boundaries of what we can understand.

If you love books and love to read this book will help you to appreciate and perhaps read deeper!



Rachel Griffis, Julie Ooms, & Rachel Roberts - Deep Reading

#BookClub with Rachel B. Griffis (PhD, Baylor University) who is an associate professor of English at Spring Arbor University in Spring Arbor, Michigan. Julie Ooms (PhD, Baylor University) is an associate professor of English at Missouri Baptist University in St. Louis, Missouri. Rachel M. De Smith Roberts (PhD, Baylor University) is an associate professor of English at North Greenville University in Tigerville, South Carolina." from the video introduction


"This book helps readers develop practices that will result in deep, formative, and faithful reading so they can contribute to the flourishing of their communities and cultivate their own spiritual and intellectual depth.

The authors present reading as a remedy for three prevalent cultural vices--distraction, hostility, and consumerism--that impact the possibility of formative reading. Informed by James K. A. Smith's work on "the spiritual power of habit," Deep Reading provides resources for engaging in formative and culturally subversive reading practices that teach readers how to resist vices, love virtue, and desire the good.

Rather than emphasizing the spiritual benefits of reading specific texts such as Dante's Divine Comedy or Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the authors focus on the practice of reading itself. They examine practices many teachers, students, and avid readers employ--such as reading lists, reading logs, and discussion--and demonstrate how such practices can be more effectively and intentionally harnessed to result in deep reading. The practices apply to any work that is meant to be read deeply."



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